Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

Books!
#41
Would've preferred to read them in some sort of order, but limited as I've been picking them up as I find them in charity shops and the second-hand book shop in town. Don't tend to buy books new, our only book shop is Waterstones and it's massively overpriced. Especially when a book only seems to last me three days tops once I get into it...
Xbox - captainhetty Friend Code 4141-6343-5085
PSN - captain_hetty Twitter - @PootPlaysGames
Instagram - emily_pootle

Reply
#42
Well 'overpriced' is just the RRP (so yes too much lol)

I think Tesco have the latest edition of Colour of Magic for about £3 at the moment.
Reply
#43
I picked up the Rincewind Trilogy for a quid in a charity shop. Best deal I've ever got. Your local library should have a few in though, assuming libraries are still a thing in most places.
[Image: MQE3xPD.png]
Reply
#44
Tesco tend to be a lot cheaper for books generally I find.

I do use the library but ours has had it's opening hours cut and they're open odd times. I also have a weird obsession with liking books on shelves, so I like being able to keep them after I've read them...
Xbox - captainhetty Friend Code 4141-6343-5085
PSN - captain_hetty Twitter - @PootPlaysGames
Instagram - emily_pootle

Reply
#45
I understand that aye. One of the reasons why I don't care for e-readers.
[Image: MQE3xPD.png]
Reply
#46
So The Black Dahlia was a cracking book, looking forward to continuing that collection when I get the chance. Am now onto The Cold Six Thousand. Hoping Ellroy is as good with Kennedy conspiracy theory as he was with one the US's most notorious unsolved murders.
I don't want your damn lemons!
Reply
#47
So I got two Assassins Creed novels, a Peter F Hamilton and a first edition copy of A Game of Thrones today - for free (the perks of working where donations come in lol
Reply
#48
Read the second part of the LA Quartet by James Ellroy, which is called The Dudley Smith Trilogy and contains LA Confidential.

First of all, that film is nothing like the book at all. In fact I think the Oscar that the screenwriters got for adapting it should have been left blank for a few years after them out of respect for the job they did.

Secondly, Ellroy is excellent at making 50s era LA live on a page but the cases aren't for the faint-hearted. The whole trilogy runs from 51 to 58/59 and cover incest, rape, sexually motivated murder, sexuality, voyeurism, drug dealing and general nastiness by just about everyone.

Every character feels like fleshed-out versions of "Just as every cop is a criminal/ And all your sinners, saints" from Sympathy for the Devil.

I can't really do justice to the plots so briefly here, but as well as being a look at the way law enforcement was as corrupt as it was in the 50s and how bad LA could be if you knew where to look (Ellroy riffs nicely off of McCarthyism too), the books hinge around a murder case per story. All of them make Saw look like Child's Play, mostly because it's all up close and personal rather than traps.

The murder investigations tend to feed into the lives of others, and the plot threads all tend to cover a different angle of the central case from different characters' views, which lends itself nicely to the final act in each book as everyone is racing to stay alive, find out what the hell was really going on and avoid going nuts.

This and Game of Thrones are the only books I've read lately that had me up into the wee hours of the morning and are well worth the time. New The Dudley Smith trio goes for £12 according to my copy, but I got it second hand for a third of that, and you can find The Black Dahlia (which trails certain characters from TDST) cheaply as well. It's not essential, as it's a standalone tale for the most part, but it will give you some idea of how Ellroy paces and writes characters.

He uses slang and an of-its-time patois that doesn't shy away from racial slurs etc. and what's said and the tempo it feels like you're supposed to read at can throw you a bit in the first few chapters.

Either way, check Kim Basinger and Kevin Spacey at the door for this one as they are in way over their head. If they put this on screen now, Lars von Trier would be the name I'd expect to see attached.
I don't want your damn lemons!
Reply
#49
I picked up LA Confidential for 99p on Kindle a few months back and I'm sure I read The Black Dahlia around the time the film came out. I'll be sure to check out the others.

I just bought JK Rowling's third Cormoran Strike novel yesterday, which I'm looking forward to reading.
GameFAQs users are 80% trolls and 19% stupid. - hyjinx17
Reply
#50
(10-21-2015, 12:49 PM)ImmaturityRules Wrote: I picked up LA Confidential for 99p on Kindle a few months back and I'm sure I read The Black Dahlia around the time the film came out. I'll be sure to check out the others.

I just bought JK Rowling's third Cormoran Strike novel yesterday, which I'm looking forward to reading.

I really think they're worth it, and although there is an overarching narrative they do stand alone well by themselves. I can't believe I didn't try them out earlier but I'm glad I did.

Went on a book-buying spree at a second-hand store/ charity shops. Now onto Ubik by Philip K Dick and just re-read Mark Urban's Rifles, which puts the story behind Sharpe into context and is narrative history like Stalingrad but much shorter. Started a book about old British tribes as my non-fiction thing next. Enjoying it and Ubik and nothing is bleeding into each other, which has happened before.
I don't want your damn lemons!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: